Blog Tour | Love and Other Human Errors by Bethany Clift

Thank you to Steven and Hodder and Stoughton for the opportunity to be a part of the blog tour for Love and Other Human Errors and also for providing me with a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.

Synopsis

An unforgettable story about love in all its chaotic glory from the author of Last One At The Party

A book synopsis is fundamentally ridiculous. How can I possibly convey, in only 100 words, the events of the past year and their impact on my perfectly ordered existence?

It is insufficient space to accurately detail how I was blackmailed into demonstrating my flawless algorithm to find a soulmate, despite having no desire for one. 

In my former life I avoided trivial human connections. I was alone, accomplished and brilliant.

Unfortunately, that solitary and driven woman no longer exists.

My name is Indiana Dylan and this is the extraordinary account of how I fell in love.

There: 100 words exactly.

Review

Love and Other Human Errors is a wonderfully original, unpredictable story about love and what it is to be human.

The story begins in September and ends in January, followed with an update Eight Months Later. The story covers each month alongside some additional poignant events such as Christmas Day and New Years Day.

It is told through the first person perspective of three characters, Indiana, Lina and Jack. You gain a real insight into each character and their personalities are fiercely unique and distinguishable right from the start.

Indiana is immediately honest and straight to the point, characteristics that made me drawn to her straight away. She grows so much as a character as the novel progresses and I thoroughly enjoyed being alongside her for the journey.

Lina and Jack alongside Frank, Alan and Peggy are all brilliant and I loved each of them. They bring a lot, both to the story and to Indiana’s world. They’re all wonderfully likeable and create such a wonderful ‘cast’. The character’s histories are revealed slowly through the story and with each bit of information I loved them a little bit more. So exceptionally three-dimensional and brilliant.

The concept of TRU and the DataLet is fascinating. finding love through science is an interesting and unconventional idea which is thoroughly explored. Bethany Clift writes wonderfully and her attention to detail is incredible. The science focus and the mention of specific terminology had me learning from the outset. The in-depth descriptions of code and computers, combined with the brutal world of business and marketing is fascinating and I enjoyed it. I found myself learning little bits along the way and it was all very clever!

The reimagined London and other details accrued within the country’s state of affairs in 2030 was an interesting perspective. I enjoyed the faux history lessons and the imaginative, yet extremely realistic, detailing.

There are multiple topics and stereotypes which are broken within the novel and it’s timeframe which is extremely refreshing. The candidness and normalising of breastfeeding was something I enjoyed reading about as, personally, I have found it’s not often present in fiction outside of novels centred around new Mum’s.

Love and Other Human Errors is an emotional ride that’s worth taking. It’s creative, fascinating and a downright lovely read. It’s out now from Hodder and Stoughton. You can purchase a copy using the link below, and also help to support independent bookstores.

Bookshop.org

Note: This is an affiliate link. If you purchase via this link, I’ll get a small commission at no extra cost to you. Thank you.

Until next time,

Blog Tour | Smorgasbowl by Caryn Carruthers

Thank you to Becky and Lit PR for the opportunity to be a part of the blog tour for Smorgasbowl and for providing me with a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.

About The Book

Smorgasbowl isn’t only a fun word to say, it’s a fun way to cook and eat. Smorgasbowls are a simple and effective way to create meals that inspire. When stuck in an uninspired food rut or accommodating food allergies, creating smorgasbowls will free you. Using bowls, sauces, toppings, interesting cooking methods and even leftovers you will learn to create delicious and exciting meals using the four pillars of bowl building detailed in the book.

You’ll be a master of unique and crave-able recipes like: Apple-Chickpea Kale Salad with Orange-Mustard-Dill Dressing, Spiced Cauliflower with Beans, Slaw and Vegan Ranch Dressingand Roasted Veggie and Millet Bowl with Anchovy-Walnut Dressing. Your journey to the exciting and delicious world of eating smorgasbowls starts here. Let’s begin!

Review

Smorgasbowl is an interesting and unique recipe book, perfect for expanding cooking with the added bonus of being free from gluten, dairy and refined sugar.

The book’s layout is clear and concise, with information on Smorgasbowl’s themselves, examples, equipment, recipes, and more! A thorough manual of all you will need to successfully adopt a new style of cooking.

Caryn Carruthers provides you with the four pillars of a Smorgasbowl, four key things which create balance in your dish. I found this really interesting and it’s evident Caryn really knows what she’s talking about and has created a fantastic concept.

There are a multitude of examples for the four pillars, starting with basic ingredients examples and then expanding to recipe examples. I really like that you’re given direction but once you’re familiar with the idea then you can easily adapt, alter and even create your own recipes.

The photos, which are spread through every page of the book are a combination of arty culinary shots, ingredients and the recipes themselves. Vibrant and clear images really entice you in and if you weren’t already hungry, you definitely will be by the end.

Having a book filled with recipes that are both gluten and dairy free, with the added bonus of no refined sugar, was a real treat for me. It’s rare to find something which covers both my needs, and more. It definitely opened my eyes and brought me out of a rut. Being restricted by foods can be tough at times but having something which opens your eyes to new ways of looking at food was brilliant and I know the book will continue to be used in my house!

A collection of recipes for breakfast, salads, entrée’s and even sauces, it really does cover a wide variety. There’s definitely something for everyone, whether your looking into different food options, stuck in a rut, cooking for someone with allergies or even just fancy trying something new, I’d recommend checking out Smorgasbowl.

Smorgasbowl is out now from Radicle publishing.

Until next time,

Blog Tour | Isaac and the Egg by Bobby Palmer

Thank you to Alara and Headline for the opportunity to be part of the blog tour and also providing me with a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.

Synopsis

Isaac stands alone on a bridge and screams.

Something screams back.

And that, like everything which follows, is unforgettable.


This is a book about a lot of things – grief, hope, friendship, love. It’s also about what you’d do if you stumbled into the woods at dawn, found something extraordinary there, and decided to take it home.  

It’s a tale that might seem familiar. But how it speaks to you will depend on how you’ve lived until now.

Sometimes, to get out of the woods, you have to go into them. Isaac and the Egg is one of the most hopeful, honest and wildly imaginative novels you will ever read.

Review

Isaac and the Egg is a completely unique read, navigating grief and loss from an original perspective.

The story is told in two parts: Part One Egg and Part Two Shell. It’s separated out into pivotal elements, almost like a hard egg and a broken shell.

I found myself instantly drawn to Isaac, with his sadness being only part of him. I immediately felt his emotions regarding the egg and how he straight away treasured it, wanting to protect it by giving it its own seatbelt in the car.

The history of Isaac and his past is really well inspersed within the novel. The pages tell his story and delve in slowly, as we learn of him bit by bit. Gaining more information about his character in both timelines, really creates a broad picture of him as a person. Before and after combine beautifully to create an interesting, emotionally-driven story.

The egg is a cute and interesting, alternative character, which I really enjoyed. I definitely found it opened my eyes to the concept of the egg and what it represented by the end of the book, as I originally found it quite difficult to grasp.

As the story unravels, more information is given to a reader about what has caused Isaac to feel so low. It’s a real emotional blow, followed by further blows and surprises. A real winding road of discovery!

The little surprises within the typesetting were just brilliant and made me eager to see what would be next. My personal favourite was the whole page of type shaped like an egg, such a creative idea.

An extremely original and open portrayal of grief and loss, Bobby Palmer has a real way with words. Despite the more eccentric concept of a character which is a literal egg, there are many ways in which it feels like a truly natural occurrence within Isaac’s world.

Like nothing I’ve ever read before, and probably like nothing I will read again! Isaac And The Egg is out now from Headline. You can purchase a copy using the link below, and also help to support independent bookstores.

Bookshop.org

Note: This is an affiliate link. If you purchase via this link, I’ll get a small commission at no extra cost to you. Thank you.

Until next time,

Blog Tour | This Wild, Wild Country by Inga Vesper

Thank you to Anne and Random Things Tours for the opportunity to be a part of the blog tour for This Wild, Wild Country and for sending me a proof copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.

Synopsis

Three women. An isolated town. A decades-old mystery.

They hate me down there, in Boldville. I can read it in their eyes, smell it on their noxious breaths. That dreaded little town hates everything about me: not just my personality and form, the clothes I wear, but the way I think.
The things that I know.

1933. Cornelia Stover is headstrong and business-minded – not the kind of woman the men of Boldville, New Mexico, expect her to be. Then she stumbles upon a secret hidden out in the hills . . .

1970. Decades later, Joanna Riley, a former cop, packs up her car in the middle of the night and drives west, fleeing an abusive marriage and a life she can no longer bear. Eventually, she runs out of gas and finds herself in Boldville, a sleepy desert town in the foothills of the Gila Mountains.

Joanna was looking for somewhere to retreat, to hide, but something is off about this place. In a commune on the outskirts a young man has been found dead and Joanna knows a cover up when she sees it. Soon, she and Glitter, a young, disaffected hippie, find themselves caught up in a dark mystery that goes to the very heart of Boldville, where for too long people have kept their eyes shut and turned their heads away. A mystery that leads them all the way back to the unexplained disappearance of Glitter’s grandmother Cornelia forty years before . . .

Review

This Wild, Wild Country is an adventurous, compelling and unusual novel, featuring a string of brilliant female characters.

The story is told alternatively through Cornelia, Glitter and Joanna’s perspective. The location and date is initially written below so you know where and when they are in time. I found this assisted in the first introductions and I immediately grasped the characters differences. Each one has a very distinctive tone of voice and so it was easy to recall the situations and personalities etc. between chapters from the outset.

Glitter and Joanna’s separate, but combined timeline, make for an extensive view on the present day happenings in Boldville. Told from Glitter as a resident and Joanna as an outsider, and former cop-turned-investigator. The dynamic from the two seems like it shouldn’t work but it really does.

The friendship that develops between Joanna and Glitter, plus some of her hippie commune friends and relatives, is surprising yet also works so well. The two form a really great team and definitely show what being more open minded can occur. They both worked together and helped each other out across the board and it made for great reading.

Cornelia’s story provides the ‘origins’ and mentions some of the older characters when they were younger. The backstory provides history and combines the two timelines really nicely. Her voice is interspersed with her diary entries which create a fuller picture of her life. Her expedition is told through both means, fast forwarding through and also detailing parts accordingly.

Inga Vesper writes so well and I truly felt part of the narrative. Being immersed in America in both the 1930s and 1970s, particularly the latter and the hippie movement. Neither period being one I’m particularly knowledgeable on, and neither was I born, yet I feel like I was part of what was happening in Boldville. It felt like a lesson in history but also a wonderful story with great characters. The ‘baddies’ were perfectly bad and the ‘goodies’ were complete crime and justice fighting good.

The societal pressures and social injustice towards women, groups and racial minorities were unquestionably felt. The novel is filled with emotion and subtle, yet accurate, era related issues. At times these are extremely difficult and some tough topics are covered in a tactful manner, such as sexual assault and domestic violence.

The community really felt realistic and the characters truly believable. The divide between them is really well articulated and I thoroughly enjoyed the differing opinions and clashing of heads.

This Wild, Wild Country is out now from Manilla Press. You can purchase a copy using the link below, and also help to support independent bookstores.

Bookshop.org

Note: This is an affiliate link. If you purchase via this link, I’ll get a small commission at no extra cost to you. Thank you.

Until next time,

Blog Tour | So Happy For You by Celia Laskey

Thank you to HQ for the opportunity to be part of the blog tour for So Happy For You and sending me a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.

Synopsis

Robin and Ellie have been best friends since childhood. They’ve been through everything together, from Robin coming out to the death of Ellie’s dad. But when Ellie asks Robin to be her maid of honour, Robin is reluctant.

It’s not that Robin isn’t happy for Ellie, she just hates everything about weddings and marriage – plus the guy Ellie’s engaged to. There’s also the matter of the crazy (not to mention dangerous) wedding rituals that couples are resorting to in the hope of securing a lifetime of happiness.

Despite her misgivings, Robin finally says yes. But as the wedding day approaches, she gets the feeling that everyone in the bridal party is out to get her. And it seems Ellie is willing to do anything for the perfect day. After all, marriage is about sacrifice…

Review

So Happy For You is an interesting story focused on friendship, weddings and the pressure placed by society on women.

The story is told in two parts and both are told from the perspective of Robin. It begins with a story about the day she was asked to be Maid of Honor, and continues from there documenting her journey.

Split up between Robin reminiscing about the true details of her friendship in the past and the current build up to the wedding, you are truly a part of her world. Her thoughts are well articulated and there is never any second guessing her emotions. I took to her straight away and felt fully invested in the scenario from the outset.

Robin’s past is spoken of in a no hold-barred kind of fashion and I feel like we get to know her extremely well through the course of the book. This helped to further peak my interest and made her feel more three-dimensional. Her life is articulated in such detail that you feel a part of it. Her friendship group, opinions and relationship are all talked of in a no-holds-barred fashion. I found myself drinking in the details and even the obscure discussions, eager to learn more of Robin and her somewhat unorthodox situation.

The bridal party gone bad scenario instantly drew me in and the unusual friendship and continual slight tension and off behaviour between Robin and Ellie was fascinating. The friendship is discussed and analysed in minute detail and the good, the bad and the ugly is fair game, discussed in candid detail.

The raw unacceptance and honest conversations surrounding Robin’s sexuality were quite emotional. Especially the situation with her sister, it definitely made me feel for Robin. A portrayal that felt realistic and honest.

The facts about weddings that were dotted throughout, alongside various traditions were a fab addition and I enjoyed learning some trivia along the way.

There was some animal cruelty involved which was a bit graphic. I found it a bit hard to stomach, so just an F.Y.I to watch out for that, or avoid it entirely if you feel it may be too much for you.

So Happy For You is out now from HQ. You can purchase a copy using the link below, and also help to support independent bookstores.

Bookshop.org

Note: This is an affiliate link. If you purchase via this link, I’ll get a small commission at no extra cost to you. Thank you.

Until next time,

Blog Tour | The Birdcage by Eve Chase

Thank you to Kallie and Penguin Michael Joseph for the opportunity to be a part of the blog tour for The Birdcage and for providing me with a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.

Synopsis

Lauren, Kat and Flora are half-sisters who share a famous artist father – and a terrible secret.

After years of drifting apart, they are unexpectedly summoned to Rock Point, the cliff house where they once sat for their father’s most celebrated painting, Girls and Birdcage.

Rock Point is a beautiful, windswept place, thick with secrets and electrically charged with the catastrophic events of a summer twenty years before. The day of the total solar eclipse.

It’s the first time they’ve dared return.

When the sisters arrive, it is clear that someone is determined not to let the past lie. Someone who is watching their every move. Who remembers the girls in the painting, and what they did . . .

Set on the rugged Cornish coast, The Birdcage is a twisty, spellbinding novel with unforgettable characters who must piece together their family’s darkest secrets.

Review

The Birdcage is a twisty, fascinating story filled with secrets and stunning scenery.

The novel begins on 7 January 2019 with a brief breaking news story, the chapters then start three days earlier and time jump to 1999. The story is told between the two timelines. The 20 year gap combines present day with a childhood past which I enjoyed learning about side-by-side. Both timelines were interesting and I found them to be realistic.

A chapter is told through the perspective of each half-sister; Lauren, Kat and Flora. Three fairly different girls/women, brought together by Rock Point and their shared Father. The dynamic was captivating and I found the focused chapters provided a lot of background information. From who they were, to their personalities and the way ‘that day’ affected them, you’re given a thorough overview.

Thrown almost straight into the hustle and bustle of Rock Point, I immediately warmed to the house and it’s residents in both timelines. I was itching to know how the story would progress whilst also enjoying the ‘moment’.

The key events occurring on the day of the 1999 eclipse is an original one, something I’ve not read about in fiction before. The fact the ‘big thing’ that the book alludes to happened on such a memorable date adds further intrigue, as it makes you question what it may be right from the blurb.

The running theme and focus on art, paintings, materials and galleries I found absorbing. Having been previously keen on art during my a level’s and beyond I found the whole thing very interesting and some of it definitely took me back. The highly flammable and somewhat dangerous concoction’s that Dad Charlie leaves in his studio leave much to be desired!

The characters were all very realistic, with their flaws and issues. Their family dynamic was interesting and the navigation of each very different person was written well. I didn’t particularly like the characters but I think that may have been the point. I found this added additional curiosity and I wanted to know more about them because of it.

The Cornish setting was described beautifully by Eve Chase. It was easy to imagine the glorious summer days and the eerie, dark nights. Everything felt richly reported and I really enjoyed the unorthodox Finch family and both their Rock Point childhood and reunion.

The multitude of twists which take place in the story are definitely surprising! I had sort of guessed the core one but I was still very much shocked by the details surrounding it. A book filled with surprises, a unique and absorbing read!

The Birdcage is out now from Penguin Michael Joseph. You can purchase a copy using the link below and also help to support independent bookshops.

Bookshop.org

Note: This is an affiliate link. If you purchase via this link, I’ll get a small commission at no extra cost to you. Thank you.

Until next time,

Blog Tour | Miss Aldridge Regrets by Louise Hare

Thank you to Alliya and HQ for the opportunity to be part of the blog tour for Miss Aldridge Regrets and also for providing me with a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.

Synopsis

London, 1936

Lena Aldridge is wondering if life has passed her by. The dazzling theatre career she hoped for hasn’t worked out. Instead, she’s stuck singing in a sticky-floored basement club in Soho and her married lover has just left her. She has nothing to look forward to until a stranger offers her the chance of a lifetime: a starring role on Broadway and a first-class ticket on the Queen Mary bound for New York.

After a murder at the club, the timing couldn’t be better and Lena jumps at the chance to escape England. Until death follows her onto the ship and she realises that her greatest performance has already begun.

Because someone is making manoeuvres behind the scenes, and there’s only one thing on their mind…

MURDER

Review

Miss Aldridge Regrets is a gripping, emotionally charged mystery with a set of intriguing characters.

The story begins with an insight into the murderer’s thoughts as they are at the club. It is then told in sections, followed by chapters headed with dates and locations. This made it easier to follow and provided more detail on the whereabouts of chapters in advance of reading them. The insights into the murderer’s thoughts continue sporadically throughout the novel and are a reminder of not just their presence but also their musings.

There are also interspersed flashbacks, providing us with Lena’s pre-voyage goings on. These begin a week prior. I think these gave a lot of extra context and back story. I enjoyed the interest they provided and the fact you rarely knew what to expect.

Told via Lena Aldridge’s point of view, we are given the depth of her thoughts and her interesting perspective. She’s a brilliant character and I really felt like I was rooting from her right from the start. There are a number of other highly significant characters within the novel, and I found them all to be absorbing especially their relationships and interwoven web. Their presence really added to the overall (surprise) ending!

The mystery element of the novel was enticing and I felt drawn in. I wanted to know the who, what, when, where, why and everything in between. The whole premise of the linear locked-room style was a great premise, and reminded me of Agatha Christie, with the ship element reminding me of the more recent, A Fatal Crossing.

There were a number of twists in the story which genuinely surprised me! I didn’t see them coming at all and felt this made them all the more fascinating. I really had no idea where the murders would lead us and it was a great trip alongside Lena to get there!

As with Louise Hare’s debut, there are many important topics covering ethnicity and race privileges, as well as accurate and informative historical context.

Miss Aldridge Regrets is out today (28 April 2022) from HQ. You can purchase a copy using the link below and also help to support independent bookshops.

Bookshop.org

Note: This is an affiliate link. If you purchase via this link, I’ll get a small commission at no extra cost to you. Thank you.

Until next time,

Blog Tour | Welcome to Your Life by Bethany Rutter

Thank you to Anne and Random Things Tours for the opportunity to be part of the blog tour for Welcome to Your Life and for providing me with a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.

Synopsis

This is a love story…

Serena Mills should be at her wedding. But she’s not.

Instead, she’s eating an ice cream sundae and drinking an obscenely large glass of wine in a Harvester off the M25.

Everyone thinks she’s gone mad.

She’s left the man everyone told her she was ‘so lucky’ to find – because Serena wants to find love. Real love. A love she deserves – not one she should just feel grateful for.

So, she escapes to the big city and sets herself a challenge: 52 weeks. 52 dates. 52 chances to find love. It should be easy, right?

A story about love, forging your own path, and falling head over heels – with yourself.

Review

Welcome to Your Life is a funny, feel-good novel full of wholesome vibes and vibrant energy.

The novel begins with Serena in Harvester, and then briefly skips back over the hours preceding it, over the wedding day that never was. We then follow her as her life changes over the next few months.

Told through Serena’s perspective, you really get into her head. She’s a brilliant, funny and very interesting character. I really enjoyed going on her journey with her! Realising something isn’t what you want, especially with a lot at stake, is all sorts of brave and that’s just the beginning!

Right from the outset I could tell I would enjoy Welcome to Your Life. It’s written in a really get-up-and-go kind of positive way, whilst also dealing with both the ups-and-downs of the situation and of life in general. It’s realistic and relatable.

Serena’s friendship group are great and really add to the novel. I enjoyed ‘getting to know them’. They add a lot, not just to Serena’s character but also to the broader world of the novel.

I loved the rundown of each date and of Serena’s experiences. It really felt like being part of the situation and it was interesting to see a snapshot of how people (potentially and no doubt really) act when on dates. There was everything from ‘perfect’ to utterly bizarre!

The London references were fab and really took me back to living there. The areas and slight details about them are primarily things that you only get to explore thoroughly when you live there. I could imagine myself walking through the area’s in the scenarios and it made the story come to life even further.

Despite it’s varied emotions, the story is a brilliant balance between genuinely believable hang ups and a navigation through life and it’s natural rollercoaster. Serena’s journey is filled with a lot in a short space of time, and she truly is a tremendous character.

A thoroughly enjoyable and life-like read, Welcome to Your Life is out now from HarperCollins. You can purchase a copy using the link below and also help to support independent bookstores.

Bookshop.org

Note: This is an affiliate link. If you purchase via this link, I’ll get a small commission at no extra cost to you. Thank you.

Until next time,

Blog Tour | Six Days by Dani Atkins

Thank you to Ayo and Aria Fiction for the opportunity to be a part of the blog tour for Six Days and for sending me a proof copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.

Synopsis

Two people. One love story. Six days.

Gemma knows that she and Finn are destined to be together. They are soulmates. But then, on their wedding day, he never arrives at the church.

Gemma is convinced Finn wouldn’t abandon her like this, even though he has disappeared once before. But back then he had a reason. She feels sure something terrible has happened, but no one else is convinced. Even the police aren’t concerned, telling Gemma most people who disappear usually turn up in a week… assuming they want to be found, that is.

For the next six days Gemma frantically searches for Finn, even though every shocking revelation is telling her to give up on him. Before long, even she begins to doubt her own memories of their love.

How long can she hold on to her faith in Finn if everyone is telling her to let him go?

Review

Six Days is an emotional, turbulent love story with many original, and unpredictable, turns.

The novel is written in dual timelines, with the present interspersed alongside the past. It begins at their supposed-to-be wedding day, alongside their first meeting seven years earlier.

From the outset you learn a lot about Gemma, with her family and friends beside her at her wedding day. I was drawn in straight away and Dani Atkins writes in such a way that you feel all the emotions from within the novel’s characters.

As the book progresses, you really get to see Gemma’s personality as her emotions are put to one side. I was really drawn to her determination and thought she was a brilliant character. The sheer and unwavering belief she had in Finn was admirable and the lengths she went through to discover what happened were quite the journey!

The story is emotional and you ride the rollercoaster alongside Gemma. Discovering Finn, his personality and traits, without him being present, through third parties was brilliant. I really felt I knew Finn by the end of the book.

Following Gemma and Finn’s love story across the years was fascinating and I really enjoyed that it wasn’t a linear one. The ups and downs were much more realistic and it made me root for them more.

The conclusion to the search for Finn was definitely a surprise to me, so be prepared for things to not be as you’d necessarily predict!

There are some sensitive topics covered within the novel and I felt this was dealt with in a delicate and respectable manner. Not any less heartbreaking but definitely well-written.

Six Days is out 14 April 2022 from Aria Fiction. You can preorder a copy using the link below and also help to support independent bookstores.

Bookshop.org

Note: This is an affiliate link. If you purchase via this link, I’ll get a small commission at no extra cost to you. Thank you.

Be sure to check out the other dates on the tour, some of which can be found below.

Until next time,

Blog Tour | Yinka, Where is Your Huzband? by Lizzie Damilola Blackburn

Thank you to Viking for the opportunity to be part of the blog tour for Yinka, Where is your Huzband? and for providing me with a proof copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.

Synopsis

Yinka wants to find love. Her mum wants to find it for her.

She also has too many aunties who frequently pray for her delivery from singledom, a preference for chicken and chips over traditional Nigerian food, and a bum she’s sure is far too small as a result. Oh, and the fact that she’s a thirty-one-year-old South-Londoner who doesn’t believe in sex before marriage is a bit of an obstacle too…

When her cousin gets engaged, Yinka commences ‘Operation Find A Date for Rachel’s Wedding’. Armed with a totally flawless, incredibly specific plan, will Yinka find herself a huzband?

What if the thing she really needs to find is herself?

Review

Yinka, Where is your Huzband? is a lesson on finding yourself, with unforgettable characters and a wonderful story.

The novel is told in months, from January to July, and chapters which each have headings, followed by the day of the week. This longer stretch of time really allows you get to know the characters and the world they inhabit. The inclusion of articles, tables, texts and internet searches is brilliant. I enjoyed the way this broke up the text and also it felt like a more personal insight into Yinka’s life.

Written in Yinka’s perspective, you get a thorough feel for her character and I found myself entirely invested in her life from the outset. I immediately warmed to her and you’re thrown straight into her world. Her feelings are really transparent and she’s a very open character. She’s vivacious, funny, interesting and extremely down to earth!Her circle and the feeling of being surrounded by people is heartwarming, and you can tell how much she is loved, even if they don’t always say the right things!

Lizzie Damilola Blackburn writes fantastically and I really felt present at the gatherings, felt the characters emotions and imagined they were real people. It was such a great place to be absorbed into!

Yinka’s friends are fabulous and even her selection of past and potential love interests are interesting. The characters are all believable and well thought out with their own qualities and characteristics. You really gain a full picture and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

The Nigerian culture and food mentions were both interesting and educational. I definitely craved Jollof rice on more than one occasion when reading the book – it’s been a while!

Yinka was just such a pleasure to get to know, and her growth as a character a pleasure to witness. I really loved her, and I’m definitely crossing my fingers that Lizzie Damilola Blackburn brings her back again so we can find out more!

Yinka, Where is your Huzband? is out now from Viking books. You can purchase a copy using the link below and also help to support independent bookshops.

Bookshop.org

Note: This is an affiliate link. If you purchase via this link, I’ll get a small commission at no extra cost to you. Thank you.

Be sure to check out the other stops on the tour, details can be found below.

Until next time,